Getting More Active

How much activity is recommended?

For Adults and older adults, the government recommends the following:
• at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity
OR
• 75 minutes vigorous intensity activity
OR
• a combination of both per week.

In addition we should aim to:
• Perform two strength based activities a week
AND
• Minimise sedentary time.

The infographic below is taken from the public health website to summarise the physical activity recommendations:

There are separate guidelines for the following categories.

Summary of Guidelines by age group

Under-5s

Infants (less than 1 year): Infants should be physically active several times every day in a variety of ways,including interactive floor-based activity, e.g. crawling.

  • For infants not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes of tummy time spreadthroughout the day while awake (and other movements such as reaching and grasping, pushing and pulling themselves independently, or rolling over); more is better.
  • NB: Tummy time may be unfamiliar to babies at first, but can be increased gradually, starting from a minute or two at a time, as the baby becomes used to it. Babies should not sleep on their tummies.

Toddlers (1-2 years)

  • Toddlers should spend at least 180 minutes (3 hours) per day in a variety of physical activities at any intensity, including active and outdoor play, spread throughout the day; more is better.

Pre-schoolers (3-4 years)

  • Pre-schoolers should spend at least 180 minutes (3 hours) per day in a variety of physical activities spread throughout the day, including active and outdoor play. More is better; the 180 minutes should include at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity.

Children and Young People (5 to 18 years)

  • Children and young people should engage in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity for an average of at least 60 minutes per day across the week. This can include all forms of activity such as physical education, active travel, after-school activities, play and sports.
  • Children and young people should engage in a variety of types and intensities of physical activity across the week to develop movement skills, muscular fitness, and bone strength.
  • Children and young people should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and when physically possible should break up long periods of not moving with at least light physical activity.

Adults (19 to 64 years)

  • For good physical and mental health, adults should aim to be physically active every day. Any activity is better than none, and more is better still. Adults should do activities to develop or maintain strength in the major muscle groups. These could include heavy gardening, carrying heavy shopping, or resistance exercise. Muscle strengthening activities should be done on at least two days a week, but any strengthening activity is better than none.
  • Each week, adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes (2 1/2 hours) of moderate intensity activity (such as brisk walking or cycling); or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity (such as running); or even shorter durations of very vigorous intensity activity (such as sprinting or stair climbing); or a combination of moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity activity
  • Adults should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and when physically possible should break up long periods of inactivity with at least light physical activity.

Older Adults (65 years and over)

  • Older adults should participate in daily physical activity to gain health benefits, including maintenance of good physical and mental health, wellbeing, and social functioning. Some physical activity is better than none: even light activity brings some health benefits compared to being sedentary, while more daily physical activity provides greater health and social benefits.
    Older adults should maintain or improve their physical function by undertaking activities aimed at improving or maintaining muscle strength, balance and flexibility on at least two days a week. These could be combined with sessions involving moderate aerobic activity or could be additional sessions aimed specifically at these components of fitness.
  • Each week older adults should aim to accumulate 150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate intensity aerobic activity, building up gradually from current levels. Those who are already regularly active can achieve these benefits through 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity, to achieve greater benefits. Weight-bearing activities which create an impact through the body help to maintain bone health.
  • Older adults should break up prolonged periods of being sedentary with light activity when physically possible, or at least with standing, as this has distinct health benefits for older people.

Physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum

The benefits of physical activity during pregnancy include:

  • reduction in hypertensive disorders
  • improved cardio-respiratory fitness
  • lower gestational weight gain
  • reduction in risk of gestational diabetes

The benefits of physical activity in the postpartum period (up to one year) include:

  • reduction in depression
  • improved emotional wellbeing
  • improved physical conditioning
  • reduction in postpartum weight gain and a faster return to pre-pregnancy weight

Physical activity can safely be recommended to women during and after pregnancy and has not been found to have any negative impacts on breastfeeding postpartum.

Early years (0-5); Children and young people; adults and older adults; disabled adults; pregnant women;  after birth.

Alternatively there is a written summary of the guidelines by age group below.

Further information can be found via the following links:

What counts as moderate and vigorous activity?

Moderate and vigorous activity can be differentiated by the ‘talk test’: being able to talk but not sing indicates moderate intensity activity, while having difficulty talking without pausing is a sign of vigorous activity.
Examples of each are shown in the pictures below:

 

What counts as strength and balance

Muscle strength, bone health and the ability to balance underpin physical function. Each attribute contributes independently to overall health and functional ability, and in combination they provide lifelong benefits.
Adults should do activities to develop or maintain strength in the major muscle groups. Muscle strengthening activities should be done at least 2 days a week, but any strengthening activity is better than none.
The types of activities that can help maintain or improve aerobic capacity, strength, balance and bone health are shown in the diagrams below:

Minimise sedentary time

Periods of inactivity or sedentary behaviour are an independent risk factor for poor health outcomes. The guidelines state that: adults should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and when physically possible should break up long periods of inactivity with at least light physical activity. The term ‘when possible’ is emphasized as certain groups of people who depend daily on a wheelchair, unavoidably sit for long periods of time and sitting may therefore be the norm.

Further information on why we should sit less and some tips on how to do this can be found here

How can I become more active?

Taking the first step is usually the most difficult part. In this section there are some easy to access resources that can help you take that step to becoming more active. Activity doesn’t have to be hard or difficult. It can be something you enjoy or something around the house. Check out the following links to find ways you can become more active.

NHS One You

The NHS one you website has some great resources to get you active.

There are sections on the mind (anxiety, stress, low mood, sleep, etc.) and body (quit smoking, drink less, move more, eat better, etc.)

Within the move more section there are some useful links below:

Move More Sheffield website

Here are some great resources from the Move More Sheffield website with ideas on how to get active at home and outdoors with separate categories for children, adults and older people.

There is also an active at home booklet that can be accessed and downloaded for free.

We are Undefeatable: How to get active with a long term health condition

The “We are Undefeatable” campaign was set up to support and encourage finding ways to be active for people with long term health conditions. It was developed by 15 leading health and social care charities. This website introduces ides on how to include activity into your daily routine as well as tips on how to get started with becoming more active. There are also some inspirational stories from people who have benefited from becoming active.

Access the website from the following link: https://weareundefeatable.co.uk/

Health benefits of physical activity

Regular physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of a range of diseases including some cancers and dementia. There is also evidence that it can help to prevent some and manage many common chronic conditions and diseases as shown in the diagram below:

Physical activity is as good or better than treatment with drugs for many conditions, such as type 2 diabetes and lower back pain, and has a much lower risk of any harm.

Further information can be accessed via the links below:

Physio Run World

Our Trust leads by example! Find out how our physiotherapy team beat other physios from around the world in a gruelling challenge!p